Success Secrets from Ancient Greece

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

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Chris Lytle

By: Chris Lytle, Content Developer
InstantSalesTraining.com

Special for MAB members:

Chris is giving away his “Supercharged Sales Management” video. An Australian consultancy commissioned it for a video keynote a couple of years ago. Take a look at it here

Around 2,400 years ago, Socrates said, “I can’t teach anybody anything. I can only get them to think.”

Fortunately, I came across his advice early in my professional speaking career. It was an an eye-opening, game-changing revelation for me.

Almost immediately, I started teaching less and getting my audiences to think more.

I added experiential learning exercises and group discussions.

Getting people involved made those six-hour seminars seem to go faster.

It saved a lot of wear and tear on the trainer, too. I no longer had to talk and be the center of attention all day.

Here’s the exercise I have used in hundreds of seminars. It takes about 25-minutes and really energizes the audience.

Try it in an upcoming sales meeting for a change of pace.

You could introduce the exercise by saying, “Let’s spends some time today thinking and talking what selling is like when you’re at your best?”

Then, pose the first question below. Let every person in the meeting get a shot at answering it. Repeat the process with questions 2 and 3.

  1. How do you feel when you’re at your best?
  2. How do you behave when you’re at your best?
  3. How do your prospects and customers react to you when you’re at your best?

You may find that salespeople talk about feeling relaxed, confident, prepared, and totally in the moment when they’re at their best.

They may describe behaviors like making solid eye contact, walking tall, gesturing appropriately, listening better, and using a more confident tone of voice.

You may hear their clients react by giving them more time, sharing real problems, and even buying from them.

You won’t know exactly until you run the meeting.

I do know it will be a positive and motivating meeting for your salespeople. It might even motivate you to do even less teaching get your team to do more thinking.

And, of course, it can give each of your salespeople insights into how to be at their best more often.

If you’re ready to shake things up a bit, then heed Socrates’ timeless advice?

You’ll find more ideas on running better sales meetings at https://InstantSalesTraining.com

Reprinted by permission




Think Like There is No box

dicktaylor

Dick Taylor

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By:  Dick Taylor,  CRMC/CDMC
Dick Taylor Blog
https://dicktaylorblog.com/

One of the things you often hear people say is you need to “think outside the box.” You’ve probably heard this cliché so many times that you want to punch that proverbial box out. So when I heard Ziad Adbelnour say “Don’t think outside the box. Think like there is no box,” it got me thinking how you might do this for today’s radio.

Walt Disney

I just spent a week in Orlando. I went to Disney World and experienced an environment Imagineered by Walt. Imagineering, Disney said, was a blending of creative imagination with technical know-how.

Carousel of Progress

I first experienced Walt’s Imagineering at the 1964-65 World’s Fair in New York City. My dad worked for General Electric Company. We got discount tickets to the fair and went both years, a couple of times each year. My favorite exhibit was GE’s “Carousel of Progress.”

It was a theater that revolved around a center series of stages that showed how technology evolved over time improving the lives of families and ended with a glimpse into the future.

That exhibit still exists in the Tomorrowland at Disney’s Magic Kingdom in Orlando and I went to re-live one of my fondest childhood memories.

Walt conceived of the Carousel of Progress himself.

8 Principles of Imagineering

Alex Wright explained the way Walt Disney worked in his book “The Imagineering Field Guide to Disneyland.” There are eight principles: 1) Area Development, 2) Blue Sky, 3) Brainstorm, 4) Dark Ride, 5) Elevation, 6) Kinetics, 7) Plussing and 8) Show.

So how would these apply to radio? Let me take a whack at that.

  • Area Development: means the first impression your radio station gives off; the grounds, lobby and overall look your facility make on everyone who comes to your station. Have you stopped seeing what others see when they arrive? Look at your property again with fresh eyes.
  • Blue Sky: means when you start thinking about anything new generate as many ideas as you can. Anything is possible. Nothing is out of bounds. The sky’s the limit.
  • Brainstorm: When any group brainstorms the only rule is there are no rules. Nothing is a bad idea. The whole reason for brainstorming is to generate as many ideas as you can.
  • Dark Ride: While in a Disney theme park this means a ride that is all indoors, where every element can be controlled, in a radio station, this should mean the layout of your broadcast studios. Are they able to be lit to individual tastes? Does everything work as it’s supposed to and kept in operational condition through preventative maintenance? Is the chair comfortable? Can a person(s) stand if they want? How about the HVAC? When I toured the famous RCA recording studios in Nashville where Elvis recorded, I learned that they had multiple light conditions to bathe Elvis in the kind of mood lighting to fit the song he was recording. When recording “Are You Lonesome Tonight” Elvis decided none of the available lighting schemes worked and so he had every light turned out and the band, engineers and Elvis recorded the song in total darkness. If you listen to the end of that recording you can actually hear Elvis bang his head against his microphone because he forgot where he was and couldn’t see it in the dark.
  • Elevation: A series of drawings to bring clarity to the project and guide construction activities. In radio, this would be a fully written out plan of action so that everyone is on the same page in executing the plan.
  • Kinetics: Walt wanted to know how everything would move in one of his attractions giving it life and energy. For radio, our remotes need some serious kinetic thinking. Taping a station banner to a card table and calling in the breaks on a smartphone is not getting the job done for the listener or the advertiser.
  • Plussing: This is perhaps my favorite one of Walt’s eight principles. With Disney, nothing was ever finished. He was always thinking how everything could be made better. Plussing is non-stop Imagineering to provide continual surprise and delight to all.
  • Show: For Disney everything was part of the show. It’s why all of the people who work at Disney are considered cast members, even the people picking up the trash. How important is it to be so fanatical? Very. In addition to Disney World, I spent a day at Universal Studios in Florida. I only have one word for that day’s experience: disappointing. I won’t ever be going back. Those that were with me maybe summed it up best when they said of the rides, “they are all the same ride, only a different movie is played.”

More Outside the Box Ideas

One of the things I try to do in this blog is look at other industries and find the lesson for radio, broadcasting or education that can be applied.

Another is reading a variety of things that literally have nothing to do with one another. Being a curious personality helps here, but it also exposes you to new worlds.

In fact, my office at work and home is filled with a variety of knick knacks that to the casual observer have nothing to do with one another. That’s because they really don’t. But they caught my attention and stimulate my thinking.

“Today you hear people talk about ‘thinking outside the box.’

But Walt would say, ‘No! Don’t think outside the box!

Once you say that, you’ve established that there is a box.’

Walt would refuse to accept the existence of a box.”

-Jim Korkis, Disney Historian

Reprinted by permission.

Dick Taylor has been “Radio Guy” all his life and is currently a professor of broadcasting at the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Dick shares his thoughts on radio and media frequently at https://dicktaylorblog.com.  




Senators Push Open Records Proposal Despite Opposition

capitol3Three Republican Senators plan to introduce legislation mirroring a House package of bills that expands the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to include the governor’s office and the legislature, despite their caucus leader’s resistance to the idea. According to a report in Gongwer, Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof (R-30) has opposed expanding FOIA to the legislative branch, specifically citing concerns over communications between constituents and their legislators.

But, both the House package and the bills expected to be introduced by Senator Tonya Schuitmaker (R-26) and Senator Rick Jones (R-24) exempt communications between constituents and their legislator from being disclosed. The bills would remove the current FOIA exemptions for the governor, lieutenant governor, and executive office employees and create a new part to the act, the Legislative Open Records Act, which would subject the Legislature to the disclosure provisions of FOIA. Records currently exempt from disclosure under FOIA would remain exempt as well.




Relaxed Rules Announced for FM Translator Locations

According to the Broadcast Law Blog, the FCC has moved forward with the new rules to relax the limits on where licensees of AM stations can use FM translators to rebroadcast their stations. The new rules allow the location of these translators so that their 1 mv/m coverage area does not extend beyond 25 miles from the AM station or beyond the AM station’s 2 mv/m contour – whichever is greater. Up to now, the translator had to stay within the lesser of those two areas.

According to a Federal Register notice, the new rules are effective on April 10.




Midwest Communications Launch FM Translator Simulcast in Holland

WHTClogoMidwest Communication’s WHTC-AM (Holland) has announced that the station is now heard on both the AM and FM bands!

Midwest announced that they have placed an FM station at 99.7 FM, that will simulcast all of WHTC-AM programming on FM. The addition of the FM station will enable listeners to clearly hear 1450 WHTC programming with a better range and with no interference from electrical noise or thunderstorms in the area. The new station, on the FM dial at 99.7, has official call letters of W259CO but will be known as The New 99.7 FM. All current programs on WHTC will be simulcast at 99.7 FM, 24 hours a day.

In a press release to listeners, Market Manager Kevin Oswald said, “Midwest Communications has made a significant investment in radio for our area and we’re proud to announce the New 99.7 FM. For years we’ve been the station you turned to for real news now, weather, sports, traffic, talk and more on 1450 WHTC. Now, all we do for you can be found on the New 99.7 FM. The advantages to our listeners and advertisers are exciting as we again increase the ways we reach our audiences. You can now hear WHTC at 1450 AM, 99.7 FM, streaming online at whtc.com, on our smartphone app, and with the NextRadio app. Our FM coverage and quality of signal will enhance our already strong AM station. This adds another way that WHTC serves the greater Holland/Zeeland area with total media coverage, including on-air, online, texting, mobile, live on-site broadcasting, email, video, streaming audio and podcasts. Midwest Communication’s existing local FM radio station, 92.7 The Van will continue to bring Classic Hits to the greater Holland area, with a strong on-air and on-line presence and local event-centered live broadcasts. “




Radio Ownership Subcaps on the Table for FCC Review

David Oxenford - ColorBy: David Oxenford, Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP
www.broadcastlawblog.com

We’ve written (see, e.g. our articles here, here and here) about the pending petitions asking the FCC to reconsider decisions reached last year to end the UHF discount, to leave the TV local ownership rules in place and to make attributable new TV Joint Sales Agreements, and to not adopt any change in the FCC radio ownership rules in “embedded markets.” Recently, that list of items on the table before the FCC has expanded, with a number of radio groups making a concerted push to change the FCC rules on ownership “subcaps” – limiting the number of AM or FM stations that can be owned in a single market. Thus, while a broadcaster can own up to 8 radio stations in the largest markets, no more than 5 can be either AM or FM. In the smallest markets, broadcasters can own up to 3 as long as they do not exceed half the stations in a market, but only 2 can be of the same service. The new petitions seek to eliminate those subcaps, allowing owners to own up to the maximum number of stations in a market without regard to whether those stations are AMs or FMs.

A group of radio broadcasters have filed a letter with the FCC asking that these subcaps be abolished, citing the change in the media landscape in the 20 years since the rules were adopted. A more detailed economic study was submitted by a Syracuse radio broadcaster, here, showing that the growth in digital and mobile advertising to local companies already exceeds the share of advertising enjoyed by radio generally, and is likely to grow in the coming years. Google alone, according to this analysis, has as much local advertising in Syracuse as the entire radio industry. To compete against these growing new media entities that are eating into local advertising dollars, the radio broadcasters have asked that they be allowed to own more radio stations in a single service – AM or FM – than currently allowed.

As the FCC has told the Court of Appeals (where some parties filed an appeal of last September’s ownership decision) that they plan to review the entire ownership decision, not just those areas singled out by petitions for reconsideration, the radio ownership issue is now before the FCC. There has been some limited grumbling against these new proposals, some observers suggesting that AM radio would be further imperiled if big broadcasters gave up their AM holdings to pursue the ownership of more FM stations. Of course, if that were to happen, there would be nothing stopping ethnic programmers and others who are making more and more uses of the AM spectrum to acquire more AM stations, perhaps at lower prices, to pursue their innovative programming. This is an issue that will be debated in the coming months, as broadcasters adjust to the reality that all of the old rules are now subject to reexamination by this new FCC.

David Oxenford is MAB’s Washington Legal Counsel and provides members with answers to their legal questions with the MAB Legal Hotline.  Access information here. (Members only access).

There are no additional costs for the call; the advice is free as part of your membership.




WXYZ Reporter and Photographer “Shot At” While On the Job

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Kim Russell

TVSpy.com reports that WXYZ-TV (Detroit) reporter Kim Russell and station photographer Jeremy Johnson were shot at while covering a story last week in the Motor City.

Russell says that she and Johnson were shot at while “doing our jobs” following up on a local man accused of shooting two police officers. She and Johnson went looking for relatives of the suspect, but came under fire.

“We could not see the shooter, but a neighbor down the street said, ‘Yeah, that person at that house you were going to has a reputation and has shot at people before,’” said Russell. “So clearly that was their way of saying they did not want us there.”

Russell said she and Johnson were unhurt. She then tweeted out a warning to other journalists and also lashed out at detractors who said her story was fake news.

Read more and see Russell’s Facebook video account on the incident here.




The Robinson Report: Taste – Smell

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

OK – There’s personal bias here.

Michigan.

The return to The Great Lakes State two weeks ago to share ideas with The Michigan Association of Broadcasters was special.

Not only did we share ideas, but we reconnected with longtime friends.

Beyond the tremendous conference, Lansing’s Grand River and downtown area has been revitalized – and driving through the glorious state brought treasured memories.

The Pure Michigan radio creative also came to the top of mind – mesmerizing.

YOU can taste the spots at michigan.org or click here.

Do yourself a favor – don’t watch the Tim Allen voiced TV spots.

It might soil your theatre-of-the-mind.

Listen to just ONE of their radio spots – now.

See. Taste. Smell.

See the fog lifting from the first tee at Shamrock Hills.

Taste summer melting Sherman’s Ice Cream, dribbling off the chin.

Smell the late August water, while the sun sets on Grand Junction’s Saddle Lake.

Why can’t all radio creative be like this?

These are not ads – this audio subtly draws you to the flavor of our 26th state.

And – know that superior AUDIO bests VIDEO – every time.

It can be done.

The magic is in YOUR words – as they draw the senses into the reader’s mind.

Try this.

Write creative as though Tom Hanks is your new voice talent.

With copy no more than 12 words – the number before you need to breathe.

On every piece of imaging – or advertising.

Sure, you’ll need to engage the Right Brain.

But, the cold drink from the garden hose and the smell of Grandma’s Sunday chicken will be well worth it.

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or [email protected].




7 Features Radio Broadcasters Should Look for in a Smartphone App

Seth Resler

Seth Resler

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

 

According to eMarketer, people spend 86% of the time they spend on their smartphones using mobile apps, and only 14% of their time using a mobile web browser. If your radio station wants to reach its listeners through their phones, it’s not enough to have a mobile-responsive website; your station needs a mobile app as well.

What should your radio station look for when building a mobile app? Here are seven key features:

1. Streaming
The number one feature radio listeners look for in a smartphone app is the ability to stream the radio station. According to our 2016 Techsurvey, 84% of radio listeners own a smartphone. If they’ve downloaded your app, they can listen to your station wherever they are — at work, in the car, at the gym, at home, etc.
Seth-12. Registration/Data Collection
Once upon a time, advertisers were primarily interested in reaching the most consumers. Today, they are focused on reaching the right consumers. After all, a golf store doesn’t want to pay to reach a bunch of people who don’t play golf.

To connect your advertisers with the right people, your radio station will need to collect data about its listeners — above and beyond the data provided by Nielsen. Your radio station’s app can play a crucial role in that process. Make sure you are building an app that is capable of gathering data from listeners through registration forms, contest entries, social media integration, and more.

3. Sponsorship and Advertising Opportunities
Digital revenue continues to be the best growth opportunity for radio broadcasters. According to a recent study by Borrell Associates and the Radio Advertising Bureau, digital revenue for radio stations is expected to grow by 22% in 2017. Make sure that your station’s app gives your sales team opportunities to generate revenue.

Seth-24. Push Notifications
A push notification is a message that pops up on a listeners mobile device, even when the app generating that notification isn’t currently being used. Push notifications are an effective way to alert your listeners to time-sensitive issues. For example, you may want to let listeners know when an on-air contest is happening, when tickets to a big concert go on sale, or when there’s an emergency in your community.

5. Social Sharing Buttons
As part of a Content Marketing strategy, social media is a very effective way to attract people to your radio station’s website. You want to make is easy for listeners to share your radio station’s online content, such as blogposts, on their social networks. When they do this, they bring their friends back to your website. If your mobile app is showcasing your station’s online content, make sure it also makes it easy for people to share that content.

6. Alarm Clock
In our 2016 Techsurvey, we saw the smartphone overtake the clock radio as the primary device used to wake people up for the first time. So if you want listeners to continue to wake up to your radio station, you’ll need an alarm clock feature in your app.
Seth-37. Podcasts
While podcast listening has seen steady growth over the years, it still hasn’t achieved mass adoption. In our 2016 Techsurvey, only 28% of radio listeners reported listening to a podcast in the last month. The reason for that is simple: Listening to a podcast requires several steps: You have to download a “podcatcher” app, find a podcast, subscribe to the podcast, and then download the latest episode.

Radio stations are very well-positioned to take advantage of the podcasting medium, in part because they can make it easier for their fans to listen to podcasts by including them in their mobile app. This cuts the number of steps down, making a station’s podcasts accessible to more people.

Mobile Strategy Webinar
Our sister company, jācapps, has built over one thousand radio station apps. Next month, join us as we co-host a free webinar with the jācapps team: “Mobile 101: What Every Radio Station Should Know About Mobile App Strategy.”  Register here.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at [email protected] or 1-800-968-7622.




FCC Chairman Appears on WJR

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(L-R) FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and WJR-AM’s Paui W. Smith

Last Friday (3/17), FCC Chairman Ajit Pai made a guest appearance on Paul W. Smith’s WJR-AM (Detroit) morning show.  The Chairman had been an occasional guest while serving as a Commissioner.

Pai called the station in advance to let them know he would be in town. He dropped by Smith’s St. Patrick’s Day Celebration show, which was broadcast live from the Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center.  See highlights of the show below: